Strong habitat and weak genetic effects shape the lifetime reproductive success in a wild clownfish population

Abstract : The relative contributions of environmental, maternal and additive genetic factors to the Lifetime reproductive success (LRS) determine whether species can adapt to rapid environmental change. Yet to date, studies quantifying LRS across multiple generations in marine species in the wild are non-existent. Here we used 10-year pedigrees resolved for a wild orange clownfish population from Kimbe Island (PNG) and a quantitative genetic linear mixed model approach to quantify the additive genetic, maternal and environmental contributions to variation in LRS for the self-recruiting portion of the population. We found that the habitat of the breeder, including the anemone species and geographic location, made the greatest contribution to LRS. There were low to negligible contributions of genetic and maternal factors equating with low heritability and evolvability. Our findings imply that our population will be susceptible to short-term, small-scale changes in habitat structure and may have limited capacity to adapt to these changes.
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Submitted on : Tuesday, February 11, 2020 - 10:20:52 AM
Last modification on : Wednesday, February 12, 2020 - 1:46:49 AM

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Océane Salles, Glenn Almany, Michael Berumen, Geoffrey Jones, Pablo Saenz‐agudelo, et al.. Strong habitat and weak genetic effects shape the lifetime reproductive success in a wild clownfish population. Ecology Letters, Wiley, 2020, 23 (2), pp.265-273. ⟨10.1111/ele.13428⟩. ⟨hal-02474016⟩

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