Evolutionary Conflict Between Maternal and Paternal Interests: Integration with Evolutionary Endocrinology

Abstract : Conflict between mates, as well as conflict between parents and offspring are due to divergent evolutionary interests of the interacting individuals. Hormone systems provide genetically based proximate mechanisms for mediating phenotypic adaptation and maladaptation characteristic of evolutionary conflict between individuals. Testosterone (T) is among the most commonly studied hormones in evolutionary biology, and as such, its role in shaping sexually dimorphic behaviors and physiology is relatively well understood, but its role in evolutionary conflict is not as clear. In this review, we outline the genomic conflicts arising within the family unit, and incorporate multiple lines of evidence from the bank vole (Myodes glareolus) system to outline how T impacts traits associated with reproduction and survival, resulting in a sexually antagonistic genetic trade-off in fitness. A major prediction arising from this work is that lower T is favored in females, whereas the optimal T level in males fluctuates in relation to social and ecological factors. We additionally discuss future directions to further integrate endocrinology into the study of sexual and parent–offspring conflicts.
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Submitted on : Tuesday, August 30, 2016 - 3:50:21 PM
Last modification on : Saturday, April 20, 2019 - 1:59:52 AM

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Mikael Mokkonen, Esa Koskela, Tapio Mappes, Suzanne C. Mills. Evolutionary Conflict Between Maternal and Paternal Interests: Integration with Evolutionary Endocrinology. Integrative and Comparative Biology, Oxford University Press (OUP), 2016, 56 (2), ⟨10.1093/icb/icw053⟩. ⟨hal-01357902⟩

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